Adult Programs

The Stockbridge Library, Museum & Archives presents various programs of interest throughout the year. Check the Calendar for specific topics and events. All are welcome!

Do you have a suggestion for a program that you’d like to see at the Library?  Please share your ideas with us by emailing them to email hidden; JavaScript is required.


Friday, October 25 at 5:00 pm

9th Annual Pumpkin Walk-About

Join us for the 9th Annual Stockbridge Library Pumpkin Walk-About, which follows the Stockbridge Halloween Parade and Party. Here’s how it works:

  • 5:00—6:00 p.m.: Drop off your jack-o’-lantern at the Library (we’ll light it for you). Children who carve or help to carve a pumpkin get to pick out a free book!

 

  • After the parade: Take a walk-about outside the Library and see the lighted pumpkins carved by local businesses, your neighbors, and you!

 

  • 6:30 p.m.: Listen to spooky stories and receive a Halloween treat (or trick?!). Take your pumpkin home with you.


Tuesday, November 5 at 10:00 am

Stockbridge Writers

The Stockbridge Library invites writers and would-be-writers to take a leap into creative and skillful writing on Tuesdays from November 5 through December at 10:00-11:30 a.m.
Led by Stockbridge resident Ramelle Pulitzer, MEd., writing sessions will gently follow the outline set in the book Writing Down the Bones by Natalie Goldberg.  Ramelle writes on a regular basis, both for her website New View Tours and for The Berkshire Eagle.  She looks forward to coordinating and leading a group of like-minded writers read to explore writing practice as a way to improve and enjoy expressing oneself.
 
Please bring a pen and notebook.  All writing levels welcome!
 
Space is limited to eight participants.
 

Thursday, November 7 at 12:00 pm

Cookbook Club

Do you like to cook?  Would you like a reason to learn to cook or try new recipes?  Do you just want something fun and different to do at lunchtime?  Then join our cookbook club!

On the first Thursday of the month, we invite you to gather together with fellow cooks and friends for lunch, while exploring different cuisines and cookbooks from the Library’s collection.

Our next meeting will take place on Thursday, November 7, 2019 at 12:00 p.m.  This month’s featured title will be Canal House: Cook Something: Recipes to Rely on by Hirsheimer & Hamilton.

Here’s how it works:
1. Check the information in our enewsletter or on our website for the date of the next lunchtime meeting. You’ll also see which cookbook is going to be the source for our upcoming exploration. Typically, we’ll choose cookbooks that have interesting things to make but do not require elaborate preparations or impossible-to-find ingredients.
2. Stop in at the Library and ask for the month’s featured cookbook at the front desk. You won’t take it out; just browse at your leisure and have a look at the recipes.
3. From your browsing, choose a recipe that you’ll prepare and bring to the next Cookbook Club meeting. Copy the recipe and put a post-it on that recipe with your name (that way we won’t end up with duplicates).
Tip: choose something you’ll enjoy making—of course—but also keep in mind that the Library does not have a full kitchen, just a microwave and refrigerator. Things that can be served easily in small portions and that don’t require last minute prep will work best.
4. On the designated day, please bring your finished dish to the library with any needed serving utensils. If it is easier with your schedule, you’re welcome to drop your dish off in the meeting room, using the refrigerator if necessary.
5. If possible, also bring some plastic containers for those who may want to bring leftovers home (assuming we have leftovers!).
6. At each meeting, we’ll enjoy the shared food while also chatting about the featured cookbook and your experiences with the recipes. What would you recommend? What surprises, challenges, or need for creative adaptations did you encounter?
7. The Library will provide plates, utensils, etc. Clean-up assistance is always welcomed.
8. At the end of the meeting, we’ll survey the group for their future cookbook interests and any other suggestions.

Please call the Library at 413-298-5501 with any questions.


Sunday, November 10 at 4:00 pm

Speaker Series: James B. Conroy, Author of Jefferson’s White House

Join us as we welcome James B. Conroy, author of Jefferson’s White House: Monticello on the Potomac on Sunday, November 10 at 4:00 p.m.

In the aftermath of the American Revolution, the republic’s formative years were a time of deep division as powerful, privileged men in the Federalist Party attacked democracy itself and promoted an American plutocracy protected by law, a crackdown on immigration, strict limits on the right to vote, the suppression of vigorous dissent, and an army prepared to subdue it.  Jefferson’s White House: Monticello on the Potomac, focuses on the mansion in Jefferson’s time and the people who passed through it, male and female, white, black, and red; the political strains and culture wars that were pulling the country apart; and Jefferson’s use of the house to pull it back together, reverse a trend toward oligarchy, and restore a sense of civility and common purpose to the American body politic.

With dozens of color slides, Conroy’s presentation recreates the White House in Jefferson’s day, the village in which it stood, and the imperfectly brilliant man who used it to heal his country and save democracy when the republic was new and at risk.  The focus is on Jefferson, the house he transformed from a barren shell to a magnificent salon in a wide spot in the wilderness, and the men, women and children, slave and free, who came to know him there. What they saw and heard from Thomas Jefferson as a friend, an enemy, a leader, a host, an architect, a father, a grandfather, an employer, and an owner of human beings as he fought for his country’s soul sheds light on him and them. 

Jim Conroy is a co-founder of Donnelly, Conroy & Gelhaar, LLP, one of Boston’s leading litigation law firms.  In 2014 he was elected a Fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society in recognition of his first book, Our One Common Country: Abraham Lincoln and the Hampton Roads Peace Conference of 1865, about Lincoln’s peace talks with Confederate leaders on a riverboat in Virginia near the end of the Civil War.  Our One Common Country was a finalist for the Gilder Lehrman Lincoln Prize, awarded to the author of the best book of the year on Lincoln or the Civil War era.  Conroy’s second book, Lincoln’s White House: The People’s House in Wartime, won the Lincoln Prize and the Abraham Lincoln Institute’s annual book award.  Peter Onuf, Thomas Jefferson Professor of History Emeritus at the University of Virginia, has called Conroy’s newly released third book, Jefferson’s White House: Monticello on the Potomac, an “invaluable contribution” to our understanding of Thomas Jefferson, an “ambitious, enlightening, and brilliantly realized project.”

Conroy is a graduate of the University of Connecticut and served for six years as a photographer and journalist in anti-submarine aviation units in the United States Navy Reserve.  While working on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. as a speechwriter, press secretary, and chief of staff, he earned a master’s degree in international relations at George Washington University and a law degree, magna cum laude, at the Georgetown University Law Center.

Conroy has lived in Hingham, Massachusetts with his wife, Lynn since 1982.  Their daughter, Erin, is a lawyer at the Food and Drug Administration in Washington.  Their son, Scott, is a political journalist-turned-script-writer who lives with his wife, the NBC News reporter Jo Ling Kent, in Los Angeles. Conroy is a member of Hingham’s Historical Commission and its Community Preservation Committee and has chaired its Government Study Committee, its Task Force on Affordability, and its Advisory Committee, which counsels the Hingham Town Meeting, an exercise in direct democracy through which the town has governed itself since 1635, well before Conroy’s time.


Tuesday, November 12 at 10:00 am

Stockbridge Writers

The Stockbridge Library invites writers and would-be-writers to take a leap into creative and skillful writing on Tuesdays from November 5 through December at 10:00-11:30 a.m.
Led by Stockbridge resident Ramelle Pulitzer, MEd., writing sessions will gently follow the outline set in the book Writing Down the Bones by Natalie Goldberg.  Ramelle writes on a regular basis, both for her website New View Tours and for The Berkshire Eagle.  She looks forward to coordinating and leading a group of like-minded writers read to explore writing practice as a way to improve and enjoy expressing oneself.
 
Please bring a pen and notebook.  All writing levels welcome!
 
Space is limited to eight participants.

Thursday, November 14 at 5:00 pm

Book Club

Join the book club on Thursday, November 14, 2019  at 5:00 p.m. for a discussion of this month’s featured book, Becoming by Michelle Obama.  Copies of the book are available at the main desk.

The book club generally meets in the Bement Room from 5:00 p.m. on the second Thursday of the month. Bring a friend!  New members always welcome – even if you haven’t read the book!


Tuesday, November 19 at 10:00 am

Stockbridge Writers

The Stockbridge Library invites writers and would-be-writers to take a leap into creative and skillful writing on Tuesdays from November 5 through December at 10:00-11:30 a.m.
Led by Stockbridge resident Ramelle Pulitzer, MEd., writing sessions will gently follow the outline set in the book Writing Down the Bones by Natalie Goldberg.  Ramelle writes on a regular basis, both for her website New View Tours and for The Berkshire Eagle.  She looks forward to coordinating and leading a group of like-minded writers read to explore writing practice as a way to improve and enjoy expressing oneself.
 
Please bring a pen and notebook.  All writing levels welcome!
 
Space is limited to eight participants.

Friday, November 22 at 6:00 pm

Berkshire Chamber Players Concert

The Stockbridge Library, Museum & Archives is pleased to announce that a Berkshire Chamber Players Concert will take place on Friday, November 22, 2019 at 6:00 p.m.

Tickets will be available at the Library on a first-come, first-served basis; space is limited and advance ticket purchases are encouraged.  Tickets are $20 each.  Please call the Library at 413-298-5501 with any questions.

Doors will open at 5:30 p.m.  Any unclaimed seats will be made available to those on the wait-list ten minutes before the performance.

The Stockbridge Library’s Berkshire Chamber Players concert series is generously sponsored by Robert L. Perkel, MD with additional support from Patricia Edwina Flinn.

Featuring

Robyn Quinnett, violin Ronald Feldman, cello Jeff Miller, guitar

Giuliani Gran Sonata Eroica, Op. 150 for solo guitar 1821) 9′

Giuliani Serenade for guitar, violin, and cello, Op. 19 (1810) 17′

Serenade Scherzo Alla Polacca

Pierre-Jean Porro Grand Trio extrait de Mozart (1810) 10′

Allegro non tanto Tempo di Minuet non troppo

I N T E R M I S S I O N

Rodrigo Invocacion y Danza for solo guitar (1961) 9′

Paganini Terzetto for guitar, violin, and cello, MS 69 (1833) 25′

Allegro con brio Minuetto Andante larghetto Rondo

 

Twice winner of the American Symphony League’s ASCAP Award for Adventuresome Programming of Contemporary Music, Ronald Feldman has achieved critical acclaim for his work as conductor and cellist.  He has appeared as guest conductor with major orchestras such as the London Symphony Orchestra, Boston Pops Orchestra, Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, the Saint Louis Symphony, and the Quebec Symphony, as well as many regional orchestras including the Pro Arte Symphony, Springfield Symphony, Albany Symphony, and the Amarillo Symphony.  In August of 2016 Mr. Feldman recorded three albums of music by Kevin Kaska with the Royal Scottish National Orchestra.

After successful appearances as guest conductor for three consecutive seasons at Symphony Hall and at Tanglewood, the Boston Symphony’s summer home, composer and Conductor John Williams appointed Mr. Feldman Assistant Conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra.  He served as assistant to John Williams from 1989-1993.

In 2001 Mr. Feldman left the Boston Symphony Orchestra to pursue other musical interests. He currently directs the Berkshire Symphony, a regional orchestra in residence at Williams College.  He was formerly the conductor and Music Director of the New England Philharmonic and the Worcester Orchestra.  He is on the faculties of Williams College, the New England Conservatory of Music, and The Boston Conservatory of Music. 2012 marked the beginning of his tenure as Music Director of the Longwood Symphony Orchestra, the orchestra of Boston’s medical community.

 

Born on the island of Montserrat in the Caribbean, Robyn Quinnett began playing violin at eight years old. She has won several competitions including the National Mariam Hayes, Ruth Kern Competitions, and the Concerto Competition of the Colorado College Music Festival.

Robyn earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees from The Juilliard School, studying with Naoko Tanaka and the late Stephen Clapp. Robyn will complete her Doctor of Musical Arts degree in 2017 at Stony Brook University as a student of Hagai Shaham. She has attended the Aspen Music Festival, Colorado College Music Festival, the Festival Internacional de Inverno de Campos do Jordão in Brazil, and been concertmaster at the Tanglewood Music Center.

Robyn is dedicated to community engagement and pedagogy. She founded the Montserrat Music Festival, a summer teaching and performing festival, bringing music education and live chamber music to the island of Montserrat. She is the violin instructor at The Chapin School, teaching artist at Opus 118, and maintains a joint private teaching studio with Chihiro Fukuda in NYC.

Robyn’s violin is generously sponsored by Darnton and Hersh Violin Shop in Chicago.

 

A founding member of the Great Lakes Guitar Quartet, the Kithara Guitar Trio, and Modina Duo, Jeffrey Miller has performed and given master classes throughout the United States and Canada including the Philadelphia Classical Guitar Society, Wilkes University, and the Connecticut Classical Guitar Society. Miller has appeared as a featured soloist with the Hartford Chamber Orchestra, the Hartford Symphony Pops, Orchestra Toronto, and the Nazareth College Symphony Orchestra.

After receiving a Bachelor of Music and Master of Music from the Hartt School, Miller taught at a number of private secondary schools in New England. As Chair of the Performing Arts at Avon Old Farms School, Miller established the instrumental music program teaching Music Theory, Jazz Band, Chamber Ensemble, and Guitar classes.

Miller joined the music faculty of Nazareth College and Monroe Community College in Rochester, NY, and later taught guitar and guitar ensemble at Stonehill College in Easton, MA after completing his doctoral degree residency at the Eastman School of Music in classical guitar performance and literature. Miller is currently a member of the music department at Williams College and manages the Berkshire Symphony Orchestra. He continues to perform when not dog sledding or making maple syrup.

Music Coordinator John Perkel has spent the past 35 years as an orchestra librarian for the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, and Boston Symphony Orchestra. In addition, during summers, John served as the Tanglewood Music Center Orchestra Librarian where he had the privilege of working with some of the most talented and wonderful young musicians from all over the world. After the 2016 Tanglewood season, John retired from the Boston Symphony and moved with his wife, Barbara, back to the Berkshires. Prior to his employment in the orchestra world, John was a music teacher at the Berkshire Hills Regional School District and also was employed as a psychiatric worker at the Austen Riggs Center in Stockbridge.

 


Tuesday, November 26 at 10:00 am

Stockbridge Writers

The Stockbridge Library invites writers and would-be-writers to take a leap into creative and skillful writing on Tuesdays from November 5 through December at 10:00-11:30 a.m.
Led by Stockbridge resident Ramelle Pulitzer, MEd., writing sessions will gently follow the outline set in the book Writing Down the Bones by Natalie Goldberg.  Ramelle writes on a regular basis, both for her website New View Tours and for The Berkshire Eagle.  She looks forward to coordinating and leading a group of like-minded writers read to explore writing practice as a way to improve and enjoy expressing oneself.
 
Please bring a pen and notebook.  All writing levels welcome!
 
Space is limited to eight participants.

Tuesday, December 3 at 10:00 am

Stockbridge Writers

The Stockbridge Library invites writers and would-be-writers to take a leap into creative and skillful writing on Tuesdays from November 5 through December at 10:00-11:30 a.m.
Led by Stockbridge resident Ramelle Pulitzer, MEd., writing sessions will gently follow the outline set in the book Writing Down the Bones by Natalie Goldberg.  Ramelle writes on a regular basis, both for her website New View Tours and for The Berkshire Eagle.  She looks forward to coordinating and leading a group of like-minded writers read to explore writing practice as a way to improve and enjoy expressing oneself.
 
Please bring a pen and notebook.  All writing levels welcome!
 
Space is limited to eight participants.

Friday, December 6 at 5:00 pm

Readings Around the Hearth

Gather ’round to hear classic stories of the season.  This event is free and open to the public, and offered in support of the Stockbridge Chamber of Commerce.

A 3oth Annual Stockbridge Main Street at Christmas Event.


Sunday, January 12 at 4:00 pm

Speaker Series: Kids and Concussions: What Parents Need to Know

Please join us on Sunday, January 12, 2020 at 4:00 p.m. for an important presentation by Dr. Alan Kulberg entitled Kids and Concussions: What Parents Need to Know.  Dr. Kulberg is the Medical Director of Berkshire Medical Center’s (BMC) Concussion Evaluation and Rehabilitation Clinic in Pittsfield.

At the BMC Concussion Evaluation and Rehabilitation Clinic, patients are managed and counseled so that their symptoms can be minimized, and their recovery and return to school, play, and work can take place as comfortably and safely as possible.  The Clinic is available for children, adolescents and young adults into their early 20’s from Berkshire County and the surrounding area.

Dr. Kulberg was previously a pediatrician in private practice with Berkshire Pediatric Associates, P.C. from 1987 to 2017.  He is also the former Director of Pediatric Emergency Service at Bellevue Hospital Center in New York City.


Saturday, January 25 at 4:00 pm

Speaker Series: Clifford Thompson, Author of What It Is: Race, Family, and One Thinking Black Man’s Blues

Join us as we welcome Cliff Thompson, author of What It Is: Race, Family, and One Thinking Black Man’s Blues on Saturday, January 25 at 4:00 p.m.

Thompson was raised to believe in treating every person of every color as an individual, and he decided as a young man that America, despite its history of racial oppression, was his home as much as anyone else’s.  As a middle-aged, happily married father of biracial children, Thompson finds himself questioning his most deeply held convictions when the race-baiting Donald Trump ascends to the presidency–elected by whites, whom Thompson had refused to judge as a group, and who make up the majority in this country Thompson had called his own.

In the grip of contradictory emotions, Thompson turns for guidance to the wisdom of writers he admires while knowing that the answers to his questions about America ultimately lie in America itself.  Through interviews with a small but varied group of Americans he hears sharply divergent opinions about what is happening in the country while trying to find his own answers–conclusions based not on conventional wisdom or on what he would like to believe, but on what he sees.

About the Author: Clifford Thompson received a Whiting Writers’ Award for nonfiction in 2013 for Love for Sale and Other Essays, published by Autumn House Press, which has also published his memoir, Twin of Blackness (2015).  His personal essays and pieces on books, film, jazz, and American identity have found homes in publications including The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Village Voice, The Times Literary Supplement, The Threepenny Review, The Iowa Review, Commonweal, Film Quarterly, Cineaste, Oxford American, The Los Angeles Review of Books, and The Best American Essays 2018.  He is the author of a novel, Signifying Nothing.  For over a dozen years he served as the editor of Current Biography, and he has taught creative nonfiction writing at The Bennington Writing Seminars, Sarah Lawrence College, Columbia University, Queens College, and  New York University. He lives in Brooklyn.

Thompson is also a visual artist.  One of his paintings, Going North, appears in the public television documentary The Bungalows of Rockaway.

 


Friday, January 31 at 6:00 pm

Berkshire Chamber Players Concert

The Stockbridge Library, Museum & Archives is pleased to announce that a Berkshire Chamber Players Concert will take place on Friday, January 31, 2020 at 6:00 p.m.
(Snow date: Saturday, February 1, 2020 at 6:00 p.m.)

Tickets will be available at the Library on a first-come, first-served basis; space is limited and advance ticket purchases are encouraged.  Tickets are $20 each.  Please call the Library at 413-298-5501 with any questions.

Doors will open at 5:30 p.m.  Any unclaimed seats will be made available to those on the wait-list ten minutes before the performance.

The Stockbridge Library’s Berkshire Chamber Players concert series is generously sponsored by Robert L. Perkel, MD with additional support from Patricia Edwina Flinn.


Tuesday, February 25 at 6:00 pm

Lecture by Ken Gloss on the Value of Old and Rare Books

 Please join us Tuesday, February 25 at 6:00 pm  for a lecture by Kenneth Gloss, proprietor of the internationally known Brattle Book Shop in Boston’s Downtown Crossing section, for a free talk on the value of old and rare books.

Ken, who is also a frequent guest appraiser on PBS’ Antiques Roadshow, will talk in part about the history of his historic bookshop (www.brattlebookshop.com), which goes back to circa 1825.  He is a second-generation owner.  He will also talk about and show some of his favorite finds and describe some of the joys of the “hunt,” as well as explain what makes a book go up in value.  He has many fascinating anecdotes to share as well as guidelines for what to look for when starting a collection.  There is also a Q&A session before the conclusion of his talk.

Following the talk and question-and-answer session, he will give free verbal appraisals of all books that attendees have brought with them or will do so at his shop in Boston.

The Brattle Book Shop is one of America’s oldest and largest antiquarian bookstores.  2020 is the 71st year of Gloss family ownership.  Kenneth Gloss succeeded his late father, George Gloss, a well-known figure both in Boston and national antiquarian circles.  He had worked in the store since childhood and chose to go into the book business rather than pursue a doctorate in chemistry.  He became the sole proprietor upon his father’s death in 1985. “I found that books were in my blood and that I would never be really happy if I abandoned the business.”  Among the many organizations in which Kenneth Gloss is a member is the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America, the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers, the New England Antiquarian Booksellers of America, the Massachusetts and Rhode Island Antiquarian Booksellers Association, the Committee for the Boston International Antiquarian Book Fair and the Boston Society. He also is a Fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society as well as serving on the Board of Overseers of the USS Constitution Museum.

The Brattle Book Shop is proud to have been a contributor to the WGBH Annual Auction each year that the station has held this fund drive.  Ken has appeared as a guest appraiser on PBS’ Antiques Roadshow numerous times over the years and has been a popular guest on WBZ Radio as well as other radio, TV, and cable stations numerous times.  His bylined articles continue to appear in various antique journals and in print and online consumer publications.  The Brattle Book Shop is also the recipient of several “Best of Boston” awards in the categories of Best Book Shop or Best Antiquarian Book Shop.  In addition, it has been included in a list as one of North America’s best bookstores.


Saturday, March 7 at 4:00 pm

Speaker Series: Rosalind Helderman of The Washington Post

Join us as we welcome Rosalind Helderman, political enterprise and investigations reporter for The  Washington Post on Saturday, March 7 at 4:00 p.m.

Helderman was part of the team that won the Pulitzer Prize in 2018 for coverage of President Donald Trump and his campaign’s ties to Russia.  She joined The Post in 2001.  She graduated from Harvard University with a Bachelor of Arts in history.  Her investigation into the relationship between a Virginia governor and wealthy supporter was honored with a George Polk Award in 2014.


Friday, March 27 at 6:00 pm

Berkshire Chamber Players Concert

The Stockbridge Library, Museum & Archives is pleased to announce that a Berkshire Chamber Players Concert will take place on Friday, March 27, 2020 at 6:00 p.m.  This will be the final concert of the season.

Tickets will be available at the Library on a first-come, first-served basis; space is limited and advance ticket purchases are encouraged.  Tickets are $20 each.  Please call the Library at 413-298-5501 with any questions.

Doors will open at 5:30 p.m.  Any unclaimed seats will be made available to those on the wait-list ten minutes before the performance.

The Stockbridge Library’s Berkshire Chamber Players concert series is generously sponsored by Robert L. Perkel, MD with additional support from Patricia Edwina Flinn.


Saturday, May 16 at 4:00 pm

Speaker Series: Amir Ahmadi Arian, Author of Then the Fish Swallowed Him

Join us as we welcome Amir Ahmadi Arian, author of Then the Fish Swallowed Him on Saturday, May 16 at 4:00 p.m.

Yunus Turabi, a bus driver in Tehran, leads an unremarkable life. A solitary man since the unexpected deaths of his father and mother years ago, he is decidedly apolitical—even during the driver’s strike and its bloody end. But everyone has their breaking point, and Yunus has reached his.

Handcuffed and blindfolded, he is taken to the infamous Evin prison for political dissidents. Inside this stark, strangely ordered world, his fate becomes entwined with Hajj Saeed, his personal interrogator. The two develop a disturbing yet interdependent relationship, with each playing his assigned role in a high stakes psychological game of cat and mouse, where Yunus endures a mind-bending cycle of solitary confinement and interrogation. In their startlingly intimate exchanges, Yunus’s life begins to unfold—from his childhood memories growing up in a freer Iran to his heartbreaking betrayal of his only friend. As Yunus struggles to hold on to his sanity and evade Saeed’s increasingly undeniable accusations, he must eventually make an impossible choice: continue fighting or submit to the system of lies upholding Iran’s power.

About the Author: AMIR AHMADI ARIAN started his writing career as a journalist in Iran in 2000. He has published two novels, a collection of stories, and a book of nonfiction in Persian. He also translated from English to Persian novels by E.L Doctorow, Paul Auster, P.D. James, and Cormac McCarthy.

Since 2013 Amir has been writing and publishing exclusively in English. In recent years his work has appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, LRB, Lithub, etc. He was the recipient of The Axinn Foundation/E.L. Doctorow Fellowship for 2016 – 2018 from NYU. His first novel in English, Then the Fish Swallowed Him, will be published by HarperCollins in 2020