Adult Programs

The Stockbridge Library, Museum & Archives presents various programs of interest throughout the year. Check the Calendar for specific topics and events. All are welcome!

Do you have a suggestion for a program that you’d like to see at the Library?  Please share your ideas with us by emailing them to email hidden; JavaScript is required.


Friday, January 24 at 2:00 pm

Tech Help

Need some help with technology? Bring your questions, phones, tablets and computers to the Library on Friday afternoons. By appointment only. Call to reserve your spot! 413-298-5501


Saturday, January 25 at 4:00 pm

Speaker Series: Clifford Thompson, Author of What It Is: Race, Family, and One Thinking Black Man’s Blues

Join us as we welcome Cliff Thompson, author of What It Is: Race, Family, and One Thinking Black Man’s Blues on Saturday, January 25 at 4:00 p.m.

Thompson was raised to believe in treating every person of every color as an individual, and he decided as a young man that America, despite its history of racial oppression, was his home as much as anyone else’s.  As a middle-aged, happily married father of biracial children, Thompson finds himself questioning his most deeply held convictions when the race-baiting Donald Trump ascends to the presidency–elected by whites, whom Thompson had refused to judge as a group, and who make up the majority in this country Thompson had called his own.

In the grip of contradictory emotions, Thompson turns for guidance to the wisdom of writers he admires while knowing that the answers to his questions about America ultimately lie in America itself.  Through interviews with a small but varied group of Americans he hears sharply divergent opinions about what is happening in the country while trying to find his own answers–conclusions based not on conventional wisdom or on what he would like to believe, but on what he sees.

About the Author: Clifford Thompson received a Whiting Writers’ Award for nonfiction in 2013 for Love for Sale and Other Essays, published by Autumn House Press, which has also published his memoir, Twin of Blackness (2015).  His personal essays and pieces on books, film, jazz, and American identity have found homes in publications including The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Village Voice, The Times Literary Supplement, The Threepenny Review, The Iowa Review, Commonweal, Film Quarterly, Cineaste, Oxford American, The Los Angeles Review of Books, and The Best American Essays 2018.  He is the author of a novel, Signifying Nothing.  For over a dozen years he served as the editor of Current Biography, and he has taught creative nonfiction writing at The Bennington Writing Seminars, Sarah Lawrence College, Columbia University, Queens College, and  New York University. He lives in Brooklyn.

Thompson is also a visual artist.  One of his paintings, Going North, appears in the public television documentary The Bungalows of Rockaway.

 


Friday, January 31 at 2:00 pm

Tech Help

Need some help with technology? Bring your questions, phones, tablets and computers to the Library on Friday afternoons. By appointment only. Call to reserve your spot! 413-298-5501


Friday, January 31 at 6:00 pm

Berkshire Chamber Players Concert

The Stockbridge Library, Museum & Archives is pleased to announce that a Berkshire Chamber Players Concert will take place on Friday, January 31, 2020 at 6:00 p.m.
(Snow date: Saturday, February 1, 2020 at 6:00 p.m.)

Tickets will be available at the Library on a first-come, first-served basis; space is limited and advance ticket purchases are encouraged.  Tickets are $20 each.  Please call the Library at 413-298-5501 with any questions.

Doors will open at 5:30 p.m.  Any unclaimed seats will be made available to those on the wait-list ten minutes before the performance.

The Stockbridge Library’s Berkshire Chamber Players concert series is generously sponsored by Robert L. Perkel, MD with additional support from Patricia Edwina Flinn. Thank you to Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Kirby for offering support for an oboist to join the company of musicians for this concert.  

 

About the Berkshire Chamber Players:

Twice winner of the American Symphony League’s ASCAP Award for Adventuresome Programming of Contemporary Music, Ronald Feldman has achieved critical acclaim for his work as conductor and cellist. He has appeared as guest conductor with major orchestras such as the London Symphony Orchestra, Royal Scottish National Orchestra, Boston Pops Orchestra, Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, Saint Louis Symphony, and Quebec Symphony. In August of 2016 Mr. Feldman recorded three albums of music by Kevin Kaska with the Royal Scottish National Orchestra.

Mr. Feldman joined the Boston Symphony at the age of 19. He has appeared as cello soloist with many orchestras performing a wide range of concerto repertoire from Dvorak to Ligeti. His many chamber music affiliations have included performances with the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, Collage New Music Ensemble, the Boston Conservatory Chamber Players, and the Williams Chamber Players. His performances include collaborations with artists Peter Serkin, Emmanuel Ax, Garrick Ohlsson, Gil Shaham, and Yo Yo Ma.

After successful appearances as guest conductor for three consecutive seasons at Symphony Hall and at Tanglewood, the Boston Symphony’s summer home, composer and Conductor John Williams appointed Mr. Feldman Assistant Conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra. He served as assistant to John Williams from 1989-1993.

In addition to the Longwood Symphony Orchestra Mr. Feldman currently directs the award winning Berkshire Symphony, the orchestra in residence at Williams College. Mr. Feldman is on the faculty of Williams College where he is Artist in Residence, Lecturer in Music, Chamber Music coordinator, and Conductor of the award-winning Berkshire Symphony.

 

Praised by The New York Times for her “splendid playing,” Natalie Kress has already begun a successful career as a violinist, highlights of which include performing at the Kennedy Center Honors with Yo Yo Ma in 2016; winning the 2012 Jules C. Reiner Violin Prize from the Tanglewood Music Center; and performing in Carnegie Hall in 2010. Natalie received her Bachelor of Arts in Music and Psychology and Master in Music from Stony Brook University (where she studied with Soovin Kim) and is Co-Artistic Director of Three Village Chamber Players, which performs free chamber music and outreach concerts throughout Long Island and New York State.  Also a baroque violinist, Natalie has performed with members of Handel and Haydn Society and The Sebastians, and has studied with Beth Wenstrom, Aisslinn Nosky, and Robert Mealy.

 

Born on the island of Montserrat in the Caribbean, Robyn Quinnett began playing violin at eight years old. She has won several competitions including the National Mariam Hayes, Ruth Kern Competitions, and the Concerto Competition of the Colorado College Music Festival.

Robyn earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees from The Juilliard School, studying with Naoko Tanaka and the late Stephen Clapp. Robyn will complete her Doctor of Musical Arts degree in 2017 at Stony Brook University as a student of Hagai Shaham. She has attended the Aspen Music Festival, Colorado College Music Festival, the Festival Internacional de Inverno de Campos do Jordão in Brazil, and been concertmaster at the Tanglewood Music Center.

Robyn is dedicated to community engagement and pedagogy. She founded the Montserrat Music Festival, a summer teaching and performing festival, bringing music education and live chamber music to the island of Montserrat. She is the violin instructor at The Chapin School, teaching artist at Opus 118, and maintains a joint private teaching studio with Chihiro Fukuda in NYC.

Robyn’s violin is generously sponsored by Darnton and Hersh Violin Shop in Chicago.

 

Paraguayan/American oboist Tamara Winston is a highly sought after chamber and orchestral musician. As a second year Oboe Fellow in Carnegie Hall’s Ensemble Connect, Tamara performs regularly in the greater New York City area and abroad. Her most recent engagements include performing the Berio Sequenza VII in collaboration with Ensemble Intercontemporain and a program of works by all Baroque composers with Jordi Savall at the Philharmonie de Paris, the Ligeti Six Bagatelles in Weill Recital Hall, and a premier of Amelia Brey’s woodwind quintet “AR(i/e)AS”. Tamara enjoys a busy orchestral career and performs regularly with the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the New York City Ballet Orchestra, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, and the Montclair Orchestra.

As a teaching artist, Tamara is passionate about sharing music with a wide range of audiences and promoting inclusivity in arts education. As part of her Ensemble Connect fellowship, Tamara has created and performed numerous interactive performances for communities throughout New York and abroad. She teaches at PS 17Q Henry David Thoreau in Queens.

She has spent the last three summers at The Aspen Music Festival, and was honored to be named the English Horn Fellow for both the 2018 and 2019 seasons. During previous summers she has attended the Spoleto Festival USA, National Symphony Orchestra Summer Institute, Brevard Music Center, and the Eastern Music Festival where she won the 2013 concerto competition performing the Kalliwoda Concertino.

Tamara holds a bachelor’s degree from The Juilliard School and a master’s degree from Mannes School of Music. She has studied with Nathan Hughes and Elaine Douvas. Other primary teachers include Richard Dallessio, Jelena Dirks, and Linda Strommen.

Outside of music, Ms. Winston enjoys hot yoga, cooking lavish meals using only her crockpot, and taking her rescue dog, Charlie, on fun adventures.

 

Equally at home on modern and period instruments, violist and violinist Anna Griffis has given recitals in Mexico,Turkey, Austria, Taiwan, and throughout North America. She is a member of the New Bedford Symphony (principal), Albany Symphony, Hartford Symphony, Grand Harmonie (principal), and Les Bostonades, and performs with the Rhode Island Philharmonic, Emmanuel Music, BMOP, Odyssey Opera, and Blue Heron. She co-founded Trio Speranza, prize winners at the 2014 Early Music America baroque competition, and performs with and is executive director of the new music group Ludovico Ensemble. Anna studied at Lawrence University, The Hartt School of Music, Tanglewood Music Center, and Boston University. In addition to her performing career, she is on faculty at the Dana Hall School of Music, maintains a private studio, oversees P.R. for the Tufts University Music Department, and is a freelance publications and design specialist. She lives in the great neighborhood of Lower Allston with her bassoonist husband and their cat, Pig.

 

Music Coordinator John Perkel has spent the past 35 years as an orchestra librarian for the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, and Boston Symphony Orchestra. In addition, during summers, John served as the Tanglewood Music Center Orchestra Librarian where he had the privilege of working with some of the most talented and wonderful young musicians from all over the world. After the 2016 Tanglewood season, John retired from the Boston Symphony and moved with his wife, Barbara, back to the Berkshires. Prior to his employment in the orchestra world, John was a music teacher at the Berkshire Hills Regional School District and also was employed as a psychiatric worker at the Austen Riggs Center in Stockbridge.


Tuesday, February 4 at 10:00 am

Stockbridge Writers

The Stockbridge Library invites writers and would-be-writers to take a leap into creative and skillful writing on Tuesday, February 4 from 10:00 a.m. to noon.

The Stockbridge Writers will meet the first Tuesday of the month from 10:00 a.m. to noon. This program is free and open to the public.  Please bring a pen and notebook.  All writing levels welcome!
 
Led by Stockbridge resident Ramelle Pulitzer, MEd., writing sessions will gently follow the outline set in the book Writing Down the Bones by Natalie Goldberg.  Ramelle writes on a regular basis for her website New View Tours.  She looks forward to coordinating and leading a group of like-minded writers ready to explore writing practice as a way to improve and enjoy expressing oneself. 

Thursday, February 6 at 12:00 pm

Cookbook Club

Do you like to cook?  Would you like a reason to learn to cook or try new recipes?  Do you just want something fun and different to do at lunchtime?  Then join our cookbook club!

On the first Thursday of the month, we invite you to gather together with fellow cooks and friends for lunch, while exploring different cuisines and cookbooks from the Library’s collection.

Our next meeting will take place on Thursday, February 6, 2020 at 12:00 p.m.  This month’s featured title will be Milk Street: The New Rules by Christopher Kimball.

Here’s how it works:
1. Check the information in our enewsletter or on our website for the date of the next lunchtime meeting. You’ll also see which cookbook is going to be the source for our upcoming exploration. Typically, we’ll choose cookbooks that have interesting things to make but do not require elaborate preparations or impossible-to-find ingredients.
2. Stop in at the Library and ask for the month’s featured cookbook at the front desk. You won’t take it out; just browse at your leisure and have a look at the recipes.
3. From your browsing, choose a recipe that you’ll prepare and bring to the next Cookbook Club meeting. Copy the recipe and put a post-it on that recipe with your name (that way we won’t end up with duplicates).
Tip: choose something you’ll enjoy making—of course—but also keep in mind that the Library does not have a full kitchen, just a microwave and refrigerator. Things that can be served easily in small portions and that don’t require last minute prep will work best.
4. On the designated day, please bring your finished dish to the library with any needed serving utensils. If it is easier with your schedule, you’re welcome to drop your dish off in the meeting room, using the refrigerator if necessary.
5. If possible, also bring some plastic containers for those who may want to bring leftovers home (assuming we have leftovers!).
6. At each meeting, we’ll enjoy the shared food while also chatting about the featured cookbook and your experiences with the recipes. What would you recommend? What surprises, challenges, or need for creative adaptations did you encounter?.
7. The Library will provide plates, utensils, etc. Clean-up assistance is always welcomed.
8. At the end of the meeting, we’ll survey the group for their future cookbook interests and any other suggestions.

Please call the Library at 413-298-5501 with any questions


Thursday, February 13 at 5:00 pm

Book Club

Join the book club on Thursday, February 13, 2020 at 5:00 p.m. for a discussion of this month’s featured book, Where the crawdads sing by Delia Owens. Copies of the book are available at the main desk.

The book club generally meets in the Bement Room from 5:00 p.m. on the second Thursday of the month. Bring a friend! New members always welcome – even if you haven’t read the book!


Tuesday, February 25 at 6:00 pm

Lecture by Ken Gloss on the Value of Old and Rare Books

 Please join us Tuesday, February 25 at 6:00 pm  for a lecture by Kenneth Gloss, proprietor of the internationally known Brattle Book Shop in Boston’s Downtown Crossing section, for a free talk on the value of old and rare books.

Ken, who is also a frequent guest appraiser on PBS’ Antiques Roadshow, will talk in part about the history of his historic bookshop (www.brattlebookshop.com), which goes back to circa 1825.  He is a second-generation owner.  He will also talk about and show some of his favorite finds and describe some of the joys of the “hunt,” as well as explain what makes a book go up in value.  He has many fascinating anecdotes to share as well as guidelines for what to look for when starting a collection.  There is also a Q&A session before the conclusion of his talk.

Following the talk and question-and-answer session, he will give free verbal appraisals of all books that attendees have brought with them or will do so at his shop in Boston.

The Brattle Book Shop is one of America’s oldest and largest antiquarian bookstores.  2020 is the 71st year of Gloss family ownership.  Kenneth Gloss succeeded his late father, George Gloss, a well-known figure both in Boston and national antiquarian circles.  He had worked in the store since childhood and chose to go into the book business rather than pursue a doctorate in chemistry.  He became the sole proprietor upon his father’s death in 1985. “I found that books were in my blood and that I would never be really happy if I abandoned the business.”  Among the many organizations in which Kenneth Gloss is a member is the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America, the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers, the New England Antiquarian Booksellers of America, the Massachusetts and Rhode Island Antiquarian Booksellers Association, the Committee for the Boston International Antiquarian Book Fair and the Boston Society. He also is a Fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society as well as serving on the Board of Overseers of the USS Constitution Museum.

The Brattle Book Shop is proud to have been a contributor to the WGBH Annual Auction each year that the station has held this fund drive.  Ken has appeared as a guest appraiser on PBS’ Antiques Roadshow numerous times over the years and has been a popular guest on WBZ Radio as well as other radio, TV, and cable stations numerous times.  His bylined articles continue to appear in various antique journals and in print and online consumer publications.  The Brattle Book Shop is also the recipient of several “Best of Boston” awards in the categories of Best Book Shop or Best Antiquarian Book Shop.  In addition, it has been included in a list as one of North America’s best bookstores.


Saturday, February 29 at 4:00 pm

Speaker Series: David Levering Lewis

David Levering Lewis was twice the winner of the Pulitzer Prize, for part one and part two of his biography of W. E. B. Du Bois (in 1994 and 2001, respectively). He is the first author to win Pulitzer Prizes for biography for two successive volumes on the same subject.

The author of eight books and editor of two more, Lewis concentrates on comparative history with special focus on 20th Century social history and civil tights. His interests include nineteenth-century Africa, 20th century France and Islamic Spain.

W.E.B. Du Bois was born February 23, 1868 in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. Professor Lewis’s talk is given in honor of W. E.B. Du Bois and Black History Month.


Tuesday, March 3 at 10:00 am

Stockbridge Writers

The Stockbridge Library invites writers and would-be-writers to take a leap into creative and skillful writing on Tuesday, March 3 from 10:00 a.m. to noon.

The Stockbridge Writers will meet the first Tuesday of the month from 10:00 a.m. to noon. This program is free and open to the public.  Please bring a pen and notebook.  All writing levels welcome!
 
Led by Stockbridge resident Ramelle Pulitzer, MEd., writing sessions will gently follow the outline set in the book Writing Down the Bones by Natalie Goldberg.  Ramelle writes on a regular basis for her website New View Tours.  She looks forward to coordinating and leading a group of like-minded writers ready to explore writing practice as a way to improve and enjoy expressing oneself. 

Saturday, March 7 at 4:00 pm

Speaker Series: Charlotte Bacon Ripley Sorenson

In Charlotte’s Way: A Woman’s Path Through Changing Times, Charlotte Bacon Ripley Sorenson describes her 80-year life journey as a witness to and participant in the enormous cultural and technological changes that have impacted society in general and women in particular during her lifetime. From the pre-television era to the era of artificial intelligence; from a time when professional choices for women were severely limited to a time when women leaders are found in all professions, Charlotte’s story is at once uniquely her own and very much all of ours. Joyfully open to adventure and diverse cultures and drawing from her experience living and traveling widely both in Europe and in Asia, Charlotte skillfully interweaves family anecdotes and spiritual and philosophical reflections with social, political, and historical facts and observations.

She writes with sensitivity, gusto, curiosity, and humor, placing intimate details and thoughtful insights in a broad context. Her descriptions of the natural world and our shared responsibility to the planet are thoughtful and vivid.


Friday, March 27 at 6:00 pm

Berkshire Chamber Players Concert

The Stockbridge Library, Museum & Archives is pleased to announce that a Berkshire Chamber Players Concert will take place on Friday, March 27, 2020 at 6:00 p.m.  This will be the final concert of the season.

Tickets will be available at the Library on a first-come, first-served basis; space is limited and advance ticket purchases are encouraged.  Tickets are $20 each.  Please call the Library at 413-298-5501 with any questions.

Doors will open at 5:30 p.m.  Any unclaimed seats will be made available to those on the wait-list ten minutes before the performance.

Featuring:
Vivaldi Cello Concerto in B Minor
Schubert Quintet for two violins, a viola, and two cellos

The Stockbridge Library’s Berkshire Chamber Players concert series is generously sponsored by Robert L. Perkel, MD with additional support from Patricia Edwina Flinn.


Saturday, May 16 at 4:00 pm

Speaker Series: Amir Ahmadi Arian, Author of Then the Fish Swallowed Him

Join us as we welcome Amir Ahmadi Arian, author of Then the Fish Swallowed Him on Saturday, May 16 at 4:00 p.m.

Yunus Turabi, a bus driver in Tehran, leads an unremarkable life. A solitary man since the unexpected deaths of his father and mother years ago, he is decidedly apolitical—even during the driver’s strike and its bloody end. But everyone has their breaking point, and Yunus has reached his.

Handcuffed and blindfolded, he is taken to the infamous Evin prison for political dissidents. Inside this stark, strangely ordered world, his fate becomes entwined with Hajj Saeed, his personal interrogator. The two develop a disturbing yet interdependent relationship, with each playing his assigned role in a high stakes psychological game of cat and mouse, where Yunus endures a mind-bending cycle of solitary confinement and interrogation. In their startlingly intimate exchanges, Yunus’s life begins to unfold—from his childhood memories growing up in a freer Iran to his heartbreaking betrayal of his only friend. As Yunus struggles to hold on to his sanity and evade Saeed’s increasingly undeniable accusations, he must eventually make an impossible choice: continue fighting or submit to the system of lies upholding Iran’s power.

About the Author: AMIR AHMADI ARIAN started his writing career as a journalist in Iran in 2000. He has published two novels, a collection of stories, and a book of nonfiction in Persian. He also translated from English to Persian novels by E.L Doctorow, Paul Auster, P.D. James, and Cormac McCarthy.

Since 2013 Amir has been writing and publishing exclusively in English. In recent years his work has appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, LRB, Lithub, etc. He was the recipient of The Axinn Foundation/E.L. Doctorow Fellowship for 2016 – 2018 from NYU. His first novel in English, Then the Fish Swallowed Him, will be published by HarperCollins in 2020


Monday, June 15 at 8:00 am

Stockbridge Library 2020 Golf & Tennis Tournament

Save the Date!  More details to follow.